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Church books at FamilySearch

FamilySearch, the genealogy website of the Mormons, had scans of the civil register for a while now. Recently they also started adding scans of pre-1811 church books: Baptisms, marriages, burials, membership lists and more. Currently available are the provinces Groningen, Drenthe, Noord-Holland, Zuid-Holland, Utrecht, Noord-Brabant, and Zeeland (seven out of twelve provinces).

The scans are made from microfilms that the church had in their collection. They are not indexed and have to be browsed image by image, similar to browsing the films themselves.

To find them on the FamilySearch website, click Continental Europe and browse to Netherlands. While you are there, have a look at the many other resources on their website - there's bound to be a few that are useful for your research.

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The cemetery of Witteveen

On many genealogy blogs, Tuesday is Tombstone Tuesday - bloggers share photos of their ancestors' tombs, or otherwise write cemetery related blog posts. On Tombstone Tuesdays, Trace your Dutch roots posts articles related to Dutch cemeteries, burial practices, or individual graves. Today: A photo impression of the cemetery of Witteveen.

Witteveen is a small village in the rural province Drenthe. It was founded in 1926, for laborers from Dutch cities who settled here for work procurement projects. I recently visited their cemetery, on a quiet spot just outside the village. Below I share a photo impression of this beautiful rural Dutch cemetery.

Witteveen cemetery

Witteveen cemetery

Witteveen cemetery

Witteveen cemetery

Witteveen cemetery

Witteveen cemetery

Witteveen cemetery

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Dutch archive news, July 2010

Book-scanning machine, ALA, Los Angeles, CA 2.JPG

  • Genlias has new baptisms from Zuid-Holland (Brielle), births from Zuid-Holland (major update), marriages from Drenthe (most towns) and Zuid-Holland (major update), and deaths from Zuid-Holland (Alblasserdam, Giessendam and Zuidwijk).
  • The National Library of The Netherlands announced that Google will scan over 160,000 18th and 19th century books from their collection. These books will (eventually) become available on the websites of Google Books, Europeana, and of course the National Library.
  • The Central Bureau for Genealogy launched a new blog (in Dutch) Migranten (Migrants), about the history of immigration into and emigration from The Netherlands.
  • Another Dutch archive on Twitter: the archive of Gorinchem (@archGorinchem). See the complete list of tweeting archives.

Photo: Book-scanning machine, by Cory Doctorow.

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Dutch archive news April-May 2010

  • Genlias added birth and death records from the Netherlands Antilles (birth records from Aruba, death records from Saba), marriage records from Drenthe (Anloo), birth records from Flevoland (Urk), and death records from Noord-Brabant (a major update).

Digitized newspaper

  • The National Library of the Netherlands is digitizing Dutch newspapers from 1618 to the late 20th century (as I announced before). The first batch of one million pages is available now, the other seven million pages will be added over the next 18 months. The newspapers are in Dutch, of course, and so is the search page.
  • The National Library, together with the National Archive of Suriname, will digitize newspapers from Suriname from 1774-1995. This includes papers from the collections of the National Archive of Suriname and papers from the collections of the National Library of the Netherlands.
  • More newspapers: Tresoar announced several digitized regional newspapers from the northern part of the country (Groningen, Friesland, Drenthe) are now available on a new website. In the future they will add more (northern) newspapers.
  • The Zeeland archive has a new website. There is no English interface, only an English summary.
  • The Overijssel archive opened a flickr account. Currently there is only an album about football (soccer) in Zwolle, hopefully other albums will follow soon.
  • The Utrecht archive opened a new website section about Utrecht in WWII, but only in Dutch.
  • The Dutch National Archive, which is also the provincial archive of Zuid-Holland, has copies of the church books of the province Zuid-Holland (the originals are scattered throughout the province). Over the next few months these copies will be digitized and from November they should be available on the website of the National Archive. In the meantime these copies cannot be consulted by archive visitors. (link)

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2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

My ancestor was an Englishman, John Hilton Jackson, born in Holland who went out to Surinam to manage a coffee planation in 1840s. He married (and died) there after becoming a District Commissioner in Paramaribo. I cannot find him on Genlias, where are these records?

 
Blogger Henk van Kampen said...

If he's born in Holland after 1811 there should be a birth record somewhere. It will end up in Genlias (or its successor, http://wiewaswie.nl/) eventually. Do you know when/where he was born?

Surinam related records are either in Surinam, or in the Dutch national archives. Some of them are online, at http://www.gahetna.nl/. In a database of freed slaves I found a Magdalena Maatje Hilton, former owner E. van Emden, surety J.H. Jackson - is this surety your ancestor?

 

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Dutch archive news November 2009

  • Many archives announced limited opening hours and service around the holidays.
  • Genlias added new birth records from Utrecht, new marriage records from Friesland, and new death records from Friesland and Utrecht.
  • The National Archive opened an e-depot. Nowadays many government records are only created electronically. These records need to be remain accessible for interested parties and have to be archived and kept for future generations, just like the paper records of the past. Though currently a pilot with just a few records, the e-depot of the national archive will eventually electronically store and archive these records.
  • The first selection of audiovisual material for Open Images is now available online. The subjects of the 469 items that can now be found on Open Images are very diverse, such as an item about a caravan that can also be used as a boat, a video about the Tour de France in the Netherlands and about the first residents of Almere city.
  • Drenlias is adding tax registers from the 17th and 18th century. The Groningen archive is publishing estate inventories online. So if your ancestors lived in Groningen or Drenthe you can soon find out if they prospered.
  • The Amsterdam city archive published pre-1811 burial registers on their website, available here.

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Online genealogy in Drenthe

For more information see Genealogy in Drenthe.

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Reader's question: Roelfsema

Karin asked me:

How is it possible to find a Roelf Roelfsema who became the father of Gritje Cornelia born 8/3 1889?
Gritje Cornelia Roelfsema was born 8/3 1889 in Gravenhage as the daughter of Roelf Roelfsema and Christina Mathis. According to the family legend they were of Frisian descent.

Only a few acts from Den Haag (also known as 's-Gravenhage, or in English The Hague) are in Genlias, but The Hague does have its own database. I found the birth act of Grietje Cornelia Roelfsema in this database: Act 1080, 9 March 1889. Summary: Grietje Cornelia was born on 8 March at 3:30 pm. Parents are Roelf Roelfsema, 36, carpenter, and his wife Christina Frederika Matthijs, without occupation, both living in The Hague.

Note that 8/3 1889 means 8 March, not 3 August, 1889!

Roelf and Christina Frederika married in The Hague (marriage act 474, 1 June 1887): Roelf Roelfsema, 34, carpenter, born in Norg, living in The Hague, son of Kornelis Roelfsema (deceased) and Grietje Jans (without occupation, living in The Hague), married Christina Frederika Matthijs, 21, without occupation, born and living in The Hague, daughter of Johannes Frederik Matthijs (bookbinder, living in The Hague, present at the wedding) and Frederika Kaemmerer (deceased).

Note that Christina Frederika's father had to give permission for the wedding (as she was not yet 30), so the marriage act states he was present and consented. Roelf did not need parental permission (he was over 30), so whether his mother was present at the wedding is not listed in the marriage act.

In 1902 an interesting note was written in the margin of the wedding act: The marriage ended by divorce. The court declared the divorce on 17 December 1901, and it was registered in the margin of the marriage act on 17 February 1902.

You can continue the Roelfsema line on Genlias. As far as I can see, the Roelfsema's lived in Delfzijl (province Groningen) in the early 19th century. I don't see a connection with Friesland (yet).

Do you also have a question about Dutch genealogy that you want me to discuss? Leave your question in the comments below this post, or use the contact form.

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5 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

My grandmother's name was Christina Fredricka Roelfsema, daughter of Roelf Roelfsema and Christina Matthijs. Christina came to the U.S. in 1914 with her husband Adan de Rijke. Please send me information on what you might have on Roelf Roelfsema & Christina Matthijs.

bonniejwilson@yahoo.com

 
Blogger Henk van Kampen said...

Check the Genlias and The Hague databases mentioned above, and the The Hague population register that recently came online. In this database you can find a scan of a record of Adam Marius de Rijke, his wife Christina Frederika Roelfsema and their daughter Helena Santina.

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

my mother was Helena Santina DeRijke......she just passed away in 2007

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

can you give me the contact information on Karin?

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I can't find a scan of a record of Adam Marius de Rijke, his wife Christina Frederika Roelfsema and their daughter Helena Santina. Can you e-mail it to me?

bonniejwilson@yahoo.com

 

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Dutch archive news roundup: April 2009

  • Genlias added birth and marriage acts from Friesland, and birth, marriage and death acts from Utrecht.
  • The Dutch National Archive published new images on flickr The Commons, including a set of images related to New York.
  • The archives in Groningen opened a new image database: Beeldbank Groningen.
  • Drenlias, the database of BMD acts from Drenthe, added scans of death acts of the period 1943-1952. This includes the death act of the concentration camp in Westerbork, but also many death acts of Jews who died in e.g. Auschwitz or Sobibor. Death acts for these people were usually made up after the war in their last place of residence. These death acts often have supplements, scans of these documents are also online.
  • Last year, I wrote about the Archiefbank (Archives Database) of the Amsterdam City Archive. The Archiefbank recently became available in English. The Archiefbank was one of the winners of Best Archives Website, awarded by ArchivesNext.

Photo: Queen Wilhelmina visits New York and is welcomed by Mayor La Guardia. Dutch National Archive, on flickr The Commons.

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Dutch archive news roundup: March 2008

News from the Dutch archives:

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Online records: Emigrants from Drenthe

The website

A database of genealogical information on emigrants from Drenthe, compiled by Arend Everts. The database is on the Drenlias website that we looked at yesterday, but it's completely separate from the rest of the website, there is not even a link to it on the Drenlias homepage.

What do they have?

Emigrants from Drenthe, between 1840 and 1930. The database is compiled from Dutch population registers and archives from Pella, Iowa, and Holland and Grand Rapids, Michigan. Records list the date of emigration and the destination, and some biographical information, like name, date of birth, names of parents, spouse and children, and occupations.

Is there an English interface?

Yes, the search interface and all of the information pages are available in English, except for a page with a biography of the researcher and a short motivation for his quest. Click on English on the top right of the page.

How do I use it?

You can browse the list of surnames or the list of destinations, or you can search the database, by choosing the appropriate options at the top of the page. When you browse you can click through to the individual emigrants. The search interface is simple, fill in the fields and press the search button.

How much does it cost?

It's free.

Future plans

There is no public statement about future plans, but I expect the project is completed.

Conclusion

If your ancestors emigrated from Drenthe between 1840 and 1930, Emigrants from Drenthe is a useful site. The database has information on emigrants and their families, and nothing else, so if emigrants from Drenthe is what you're looking for, this website is where you should go.

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Online records: Drenlias

The website

Drenlias is the database of the provincial archive of Drenthe.

What do they have?

BMD records (from 1811), church books (until 1811, funeral books are missing for most places), notarial archives (from 1810), inheritance tax registrations (from 1806).

Is there an English interface?

There is currently no English interface.

How do I use it?

In the navigation menu at the top, choose Zoeken 1600-1811 (Search between 1600 and 1811) to search the church books, or Zoeken na 1811 (Search after 1811) for the other databases. Select a database to search: Burgerlijke Stand (civil register), Notariële akten (notarial deeds), Successiememories (inheritance tax registers), Alle bestanden (all databases), or Kerkregisters (church registers). Fill in achternaam (surname) and voornaam (first name) and press zoeken (search).

If searching by name gives too many results, you can narrow it down by clicking Meer zoekmogelijkheden (more search options). You can search on two names, on place (gemeente), or on date range (van, tot is from, until), among others.

How much does it cost?

There is no charge for searching and browsing the information in the database.

Future plans

Indexing the funeral books (before 1811), the inheritance tax registrations, and the notarial archives is still in progress, these will be added to Drenlias on a future date.

Conclusion

The church books and notarial archives are not available on Genlias (yet), so Drenlias is a useful resource if your ancestors lived in Drenthe. They do have less information then the other provincial databases we looked at so far, though. It's a pity the website is not available in English.

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Dutch archives news roundup - June 2007

News from the Dutch archives.
  • Several Dutch archives have limited opening hours during July and August. Check their websites for details.
  • The Drenthe Archive presented the book In de versnelling, about cars in Drenthe in the last 100 years. There is also an exposition on the same topic in the Drenthe Archive (until August).
  • The Gelderland Archive announced a major overhaul of their website. The new website will launch in July. The archive also announced that one million Gelderland death acts are now indexed in Genlias.
  • The National Archive announced a new website about Zuid-Holland history: www.geschiedenisvanzuidholland.nl, a cooperation of several institutions in Zuid-Holland. The new website seems to be available in Dutch only.
  • It was already possible to search for gezinskaarten on the website of the Amsterdam Archive, but you can now also see the scans online. A great service if you have relatives in late-19th or early-20th century Amsterdam. This is a paid service: Searching the index is still free, but you have to pay to see scans.

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Graafschap church saves its heritage in museum

From the Grand Rapids Press:

Graafschap church saves its heritage in museum:

"The center represents a virtual timeline of how the CRC and Graafschap have grown up together since the community's founding and the 1857 secession. About 100 settlers from the provinces of Drenthe and Bentheim, the latter now part of Germany, settled here in 1847.
Numerous artifacts depict the early days of the church and community, and murals show the role of such prominent early leaders as the Rev. Albertus Van Raalte, Holland's founder, and the Rev. Douwe VanderWerp, Graafschap's first pastor and the founder of the publication that would become know as The Banner."

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